Friday, 14 September 2018

2018 Parliamentary/Wards Boundaries Review




 The Boundary Commission for England provided the Government with its final recommendations for new constituency boundaries on 5 September 2018.

The Government laid the recommendations in Parliament for consideration on 10 September 2018.

The final recommendations can be found at: https://www.bce2018.org.uk/node/6485

The final recommendations for Brent are:

·         Ealing North and Sudbury Constituency (Northwick Park, Sudbury Wards)
·         Harrow South and Kenton Constituency (Kenton and Queensbury Wards)
·         Paddington and Queen’s Park Constituency (Kilburn and Queens Park Wards)
·         Wembley Constituency (Alperton, Barnhill, Dollis Hill, Dudden Hill, Fryent, Preston, Tokyngton, Welsh Harp, Wembley Central Wards)
·         Willesden and Shepherd’s Bush Constituency ( Brondesbury Park, Harlesden, Kensal Green, Mapesbury, Stonebridge, Willesden Green)

More information can be found at: https://www.bce2018.org

Please note this is entirely separate from the review currently being undertaken by the Local Government Boundary Commission.

The independent Local Government Boundary Commission for England has launched a consultation giving residents and interested parties the chance to provide their views on the electoral review of Brent Council. The review will agree new council ward boundaries across the borough.

Members are encouraged to share this information with residents in their wards so that the Commission have evidence showing how recommendations will impact Brent’s communities. The consultation is open until 5 November 2018.

To participate in the consultation, residents can visit: consultation.lgbce.org.uk or write to: Review Officer (Brent), LGBCE, 1st Floor, Windsor House, 50 Victoria Street, London, SW1H 0TL

Further information can be found at www.brent.gov.uk/boundaryreview


courtesy of Brent Council.

Brent Start - Adult Education Service


Brent Start, the council’s adult education service, is now recruiting for the new academic year. It is a high quality service for Brent’s residents and businesses seeking to improve their skills. The curriculum offer is comprehensive and delivery of classes takes place in various locations across the borough including the Stonebridge Learning Centre, libraries, community centres and children’s centres. It is rated Good by Ofsted and its results are above the average for comparator providers. Members are encouraged to spread the word to your constituents.
    
For further information see the attached course brochure.  Residents can call the service on 0208 937 3950, or visit the website at www.brent.gov.uk/brentstart.

Brent Start Brochure attached.
(Matthew Dibben, Head of Employment, Skills and Enterprise)

Friday, 31 August 2018

Brent Electoral Review – ward boundaries consultation


The independent Local Government Boundary Commission for England has launched a consultation giving residents and interested parties the chance to provide their views on the electoral review of Brent Council. The review will agree new council ward boundaries across the borough.

Members are encouraged to share this information with residents in their wards so that the Commission have evidence showing how recommendations will impact Brent’s communities. The consultation is open until 5 November 2018.

To participate in the consultation, residents can visit: consultation.lgbce.org.uk or write to: Review Officer (Brent), LGBCE, 1st Floor, Windsor House, 50 Victoria Street, London, SW1H 0TL

Further information can be found at www.brent.gov.uk/boundaryreview

with courtesy of Brent Council 

(Thomas Cattermole, Head of Executive and Member Services)

The Job Show Wembley, 10 October 2018

  
Brent has teamed up with West London Alliance partners to sponsor the Job Show Wembley. This is an opportunity for employers to showcase what they have to offer local employees and for local Brent residents to find out about the exciting opportunities available in Brent and surrounding areas. The show will have over 80 exhibitor stands and cover a wide range of employment sectors including Construction, IT/Tech, Health and Social Care, Hospitality and Catering, Call Centre/Customer Care and will feature apprenticeship recruitment. It will also be supported on the day by Brent Council Apprentices in the role of Job Show Apprentice Ambassadors.

Residents and businesses can register here.

with courtesy of Brent Council 

(Amar Dave, Strategic Director, Regeneration and Environment)

CQC special from from London North West University Healthcare NHS Trust

I feel happy to forward you following report which gives information regarding our hospitals and community services in the Brent. Please read it is interesting report. this is only for information.
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Following an inspection of our hospitals and community services earlier this year, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) has today (31 August 2018) published its findings in a final report.

Who are the CQC?

The CQC monitor, inspect and regulate healthcare service providers in England to make sure they meet fundamental standards of quality and safety.

During their inspections, which are a combination of announced and unannounced visits, the CQC ask five questions of the services: are they safe, effective, caring, responsive to people's needs, and well-led?

After their inspections, the CQC publish their findings in a detailed report, which includes providing trusts with an overall rating.

When was the Trust inspected and what did the inspection involve?

Our CQC inspection took place in early June. The CQC inspected six core services at Northwick Park Hospital and four core services at Ealing Hospital.

Clayponds Community Hospital, Willesden Community Rehabilitation Hospital and community dental services were also inspected.

Central Middlesex Hospital was not inspected.

What was the outcome of the inspection?

The CQC has rated the Trust as ‘Requires Improvement’ overall. This is unchanged from our previous inspection in 2015.

The report does rate the Trust as ‘good’ overall for our care of patients, describing staff as being ‘respectful and helpful’. We are rated as ‘Requires Improvement’ overall for being safe, effective, responsive and well-led.

Northwick Park and Ealing hospitals were both rated as ‘Requires Improvement’ overall and community services were rated as ‘Good’ overall.
What areas does the Trust need to improve on?

Immediate attention has been given to six ‘must-do’ areas relating to aspects of medical care, urgent and emergency care, maternity, children and young people services, surgery and critical care. Since the inspection, we have put plans in place to address these concerns.

The CQC also found 74 areas where we can make improvements, including:
  • Mandatory training rates for nursing and medical staff
  • The completion of nutrition and hydration assessments
  • Updating and maintaining Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) assessments
  • Increase supervision for lower grade doctors and out-of-hours medical support to the wards in community services
  • Our unplanned re-attendance rate to accident and emergency within seven days
  • Referral to treatment times for some surgical specialities such as general surgery, oral surgery and ear nose and throat procedures
Did the report identify any areas of good practice?

Throughout the report, the CQC identified many areas of good practice, including:
  • Critical care services at Northwick Park Hospital, as well as Clayponds Community Hospital, Willesden Community Rehabilitation Hospital and community dental services were all rated as ‘Good’ overall
  • Staff involved patients and those close to them in decisions about their care and treatment
  • There was effective multidisciplinary team working in the ward areas. Relevant professionals were involved in the assessment, planning and delivery of patient care - this had improved since the last inspection
  • Discharge planning was structured and multidisciplinary
  • Children and their carers felt fully involved in their care and treatment. Doctors and nurses explained procedures in a relaxed and child friendly manner
 Inspectors also found areas of outstanding practice, including:
  • In surgery staff demonstrated a focus on improvement and dedication to adopting national pilot schemes and new strategies
  • A matron had supported surgical staff in the implementation of a ‘make a difference’ project to improve quality standards and opportunities for joint working
  • In community inpatients services relatives said that staff were caring and compassionate. They gave inspectors clear examples of how staff had made patient admissions a good experience, which included for those who were more vulnerable or who had extra needs  
What is the Trust’s reaction to the report?

Chief Executive Dame Jacqueline Docherty, said: “The CQC report does highlight many areas of good practice and it is pleasing to see that once again our staff have been recognised as caring and committed.

“I am also proud that our community hospitals, community dental service and critical care service at Northwick Park Hospital have all been rated as ‘Good’ overall, an improvement on the ‘Requires Improvement’ rating in our previous inspection.

“However, I also recognise that we have not made sufficient progress, and in some cases we have not got the basics right, such as mandatory training, assessments and processes. We also continue to face unprecedented demand for our services, which can result in some patients waiting longer than we would like for treatment. We know this is not acceptable.

“We now have a responsibility to the communities that we serve, and to each other as healthcare professionals, to work hard and make the necessary improvements identified by the CQC. This will include learning from our shortfalls and sharing the good and outstanding practices that we know already takes place across the Trust.”

What happens next?

The CQC will continue to work with us to support our improvement journey. They will return to the Trust in due course for a further inspection.

Where can I read the full report?

The full report for London North West University Healthcare can be found on the CQC website.

with courtesy of CQC

Tuesday, 28 August 2018

Petrol and Diesel Cars - to be Banned in London

Petrol and diesel cars to be banned from nine roads in east London
In a bid to tackle toxic air, petrol and diesel cars will be banned from nine roads in east London. Drivers are set to receive a £130 penalty if they use anything other than electric or hybrid cars in the areas of Hackney and Islington between 7am till 10am and 4pm till 7pm on weekdays. These measures are set to be introduced on the 3rd of September and are the toughest measures yet. Sadiq Khan’s “toxicity charge” for drivers of older petrol and diesel vehicles Is currently £10 per day.

The affected roads include: Blackall Street, Cowper Street, Paul Street, Tabernacle Street, Ravey Street, Singer Street, Willow Street, Charlotte Road and Rivington Street.

Islington Green Party councillor and London Assembly member Caroline Russel said: “Islington and Hackney have seized the opportunity to give people a really strong message about taking pollution seriously and to show the scale of London’s health emergency.”

The City of London Corporation will launch a similar trial in April, limiting access to Moor Lane, near Moorgate, to ultra- low emission vehicles. The EU legal limit for nitrogen dioxide is an annual average of 40 micrograms per cubic metre or air but this was breached at more than 50 monitoring sites in London last year

Air pollution in London


London has suffered from illegal levels of air pollution since 2010, with particularly dangerous levels of nitrogen dioxide, which comes mainly from diesel vehicles. The summer heat, has caused surges in the ozone produced when sunlight reacts with nitrogen dioxide – that has prompted multiple pollution warnings.

Nitrogen dioxide inflames the lungs and is linked to a shorter life expectancy. London in terms of levels of nitrogen dioxide is nearly as bad as the Chinese and Indian capitals and much worse than developed cities like New York or Madrid.

Despite shifts in transport policy with increased cycling and a congestion charge helping to reduce the number of vehicles on the roads in central London by 25% in the past decade. Simon Birkett, the founder of Clean Air London, a non- profit organisation said: “if you cannot tackle this problem, which is much more tangible for people, you can forget about other problems.”

Shirley Rodrigues, London’s deputy mayor, says the city has reached a “tipping point” in terms of taking action. “It’s not only [because of] the thousands of deaths brought on early, but also the pernicious, chronic illnesses that are costing the health service a lot of money,” she says. “It is affecting quality of life.”